Skip to content

When You Rise Up

2010 April 26
by Pamela

I finished When you Rise Up by R.C. Sproul Jr., a book about homeschooling. Some quotes:

On not being perfect:

May we remember as parents that we are His children and that he is about the business of changing our hearts, of repairing our ruins, of remaking us. And though he has not finished with us, he has placed in our care his children. May he in his grace keep our hearts aflame for these children. May he give us minds like steel traps that we would never be distracted, that we would not forsake our calling. May he, the great Steward, make us faithful stewards of children, the most precious gifts, of which is the kingdom of God.

On not being brilliant:

The teacher need not always be superior to the student in whatever is taught. Every major-league baseball team employs at least one batting coach. But there isn’t a single batting coach who is a superior hitter to the people he is coaching. If he were a better hitter than the players he teaches, he would be the one playing. Tiger Woods has a coach who isn’t a better golfer than himself and isn’t even good enough to play on the tour. If we are going to worry about our children’s ability to learn things we don’t know, let’s worry about things worth knowing. You want people of character teaching your children. If that’s not you, it needs to become you.

On burnout:

We are parents, but we are also children. We need to remember that we are not only teachers, but also students. God, our Father, is our teacher. But unlike us, our Father is perfect in every way. He never grows weary. He never errs. Rather, our Father leads in the the good way. He likewise empowers us to grow in grace and obedience. As we come to this challenge from God, ask him as your Father for grace, strength, power, patience. Ask him (who when we ask for bread will not give us a stone) to turn our hearts back to our children. He delights to answer our prayers. You can be confident he will give you the strength.

PinterestGoogle+FacebookTwitterEmail
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS